Getting Started

First you need to install the MOOSE framework. To do this, click the link below corresponding to your operating system/platform and follow the instructions:

When installation is complete, return to this page to continue.

Create an Application

MOOSE is designed for building custom applications, therefore if you plan on working with MOOSE then you should create an application.

Your application is where code and input files should be created for your particular problem.

To create an application, run the stork.sh script while sitting outside the MOOSE repository with a single argument providing the name you wish to use to name your application:


cd ~/projects
./moose/scripts/stork.sh YourAppName

Running this script will create a folder named "YourAppName" in the projects directory, this application will automatically link against MOOSE. Obviously, the "YourAppName" should be the name you want to give to your application; consider the use of an acronym. We prefer animal names for applications, but you are free to choose whatever name suits your needs.

note

You should not attempt to run this script while sitting inside the MOOSE repository. Doing so will result in an error.

Compile and Test Your Application


cd ~/projects/YourAppName
make -j4
./run_tests -j4

If your application is working correctly, you should see one passing test. This indicates that your application is ready to be further developed.

Update MOOSE and Conda

MOOSE does not use traditional versioning, is under heavy development, and is being updated continuously. Therefore, it is important that you continue to update MOOSE as you use it to develop your application(s), we recommend weekly updates.

If you are using our Conda environment, you should always perform an update to both Conda and your MOOSE repository. If you update one, always update the other:


conda activate moose
conda update --all

To update your MOOSE repository use the following commands.


cd ~/projects/moose
git fetch origin
git rebase origin/master

Then return to your application, re-compile, and test.


cd ~/projects/YourAppName
make clobberall
make -j4
./run_tests -j4

Learn More

Now that you have a working MOOSE Framework stack, consider checking out the MOOSE examples for a beginning tour of how to use input files and implement your own custom behavior for MOOSE.

Join the Community

Join one of our mailing lists:

GMail users can just click the "Join group" button. Everyone else can join by sending an email to:

  • moose-users+subscribe@googlegroups.com

  • moose-announce+subscribe@googlegroups.com

You may also want to follow MOOSE developers on Twitter:

Install Troubleshooting

Please see the MOOSE FAQ page for common issues. If your issue is not listed, this would be an excellent time to join us on our mailing list and ask for help!

Customizing MOOSE configuration

MOOSE can be customized by running a configure script in $MOOSE_DIR/framework. Below we summarize the configuration options available:

Automatic differentiation

  • --with-derivative-type: Specify the derivative storage type to use for MOOSE's DualReal object. Options are sparse and nonsparse. sparse selects SemiDynamicSparseNumberArray as the derivative storage type; nonsparse selects NumberArray. A more detailed overview of these storage types can be found in the DualReal documentation.

  • --with-derivative-size=<n>: Specify the length of the underlying derivative storage array. The default is 50. A smaller number may be chosen for increased speed; a larger number may be required for 3D problems or problems with coupling between many variables.